BattleX
About The Game



Purpose of the Game
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The purpose of the game is to defeat the enemy by destroying all enemy troops. Since bases produce troops, it will become necessary to capture enemy bases in order to win the game. If you capture an enemy base it becomes your own.


Strategies
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You may decide to make a quick dash towards the enemy base, and capture it before enough troops have been generated to defend it, or you may wish to amass a large number of troops in a defensive position and plan your attack carefully.

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Do not forget that the terrain will affect your troop movements. The number of troops that can travel uphill in a single game cycle is less than on level ground and the number that can move downhill is more. This makes it harder to attack bases that are on hilltops and easier to attack bases that are in valleys.

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Troop Generation
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Troops are generated by bases that are represented as circles within a cell. When the game starts your bases will immediately start producing troops of your colour. Your colour is indicated by a flashing skull in the troop count window. Your total troop count can be seen next to your coloured skull.

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Troops are represented as coloured squares inside the map cells. The more troops, the larger the square.During each game cycle (once per second), each base will produce a random number of troops, perhaps 3, perhaps 4 or 5. However, if no vectors exist to move troops out of your base, it will fill to capacity (30 troops) and when full, there will be no more room in the base for more troops to be produced. It is important therefore to move troops out of your bases so that troop production is not compromised.

Bases that are either not fully built (or bases that have been partially scuttled) are represented as an incomplete circle. These partial bases will not produce troops. Only bases that are fully formed can produce troops.

Attacking the Enemy
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If you create a vector into a cell that contains enemy troops, you are effectively attacking that cell. If you send a small number of troops into a fully occupied enemy cell, they will be killed instantly and no battle will result. This is an easy way of wasting troops and it should be avoided.
If you send a larger number of troops (by attacking from multiple directions) you have a greater chance of creating a battle and wining that battle. If the enemy cell contains few troops, then it can probably be defeated from a “single direction” attack.

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Surrounding a cell and attacking from multiple sides is a more complex operation but may be the only way to overcome an enemy who has an altitude advantage. The above image shows an attack from 4 sides.
The attack button triggers the rapid creation of vectors from surrounding cells into a selected enemy cell. It is simply a shortcut that saves having to create the individual vectors. The button will not toggle, and hence resulting vectors must be removed individually.

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Troop Count
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Each cell can hold a maximum of 30 troops. Troops must enter a cell through a vector, which might allow 3 - 8 troops to traverse per game cycle. If a cell is full, no more troops of that colour can move into that cell until some troops have moved out. Troops are generated by bases and if a player has no remaining bases then that player’s troop count cannot increase.
Over time some troops will die from natural causes. Death from natural causes is proportional to the number of troops in a cell. If there were no deaths from natural causes, the map would eventually fill up with troops.

Reserving Troops
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Cells with few troops can be easily attacked and captured. It is therefore a good idea to use full cells where there is a need to defend. A cell can be kept full by vectoring into that cell and not vectoring out. However, there may be a situation where you wish a cell to have troops flowing in and out but still maintain a large number of troops in the cell. This can be achieved by reserving troops. The reserve button allows between 10% and 90% of troops to be reserved. When a cell has a troops reserved, they will not flow out until that reserve is reached. Reserving troops within cells that contain bases is a good idea, as this forms a defence of last resort.

Troop reserve decisions are persisted, and so, should you lose cell ownership, and regain it, your reserve decision will be reinstated automatically.

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Cell Ownership
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There is a concept of cell ownership. A player gains ownership of a cell by moving troops into that cell. A player can then perform additional operations, because the cell is now owned. The additional operations include : creating vectors, building a base, scuttling a base, attacking an adjacent enemy cell, digging to reduce the height, filling to increase the height and reserving a number of troops in the cell. Note that it is not possible to change the height of a cell that contains a base.

Ownership is maintained, even if there are no troops in the cell, however if the cell has had no troops passing through it for a certain period of time , then cell ownership will be lost. When cell ownership is lost, all vectors are removed. When cell ownership is lost, there is one thing that remains intact, and that is the player’s choice of % reserve. This then allows the % reserve to remain intact during battles, because, during a battle within a cell, ownership is temporarily lost.

Terrain
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Each cell has a height. The height of a selected cell can be seen in the control panel. The colour of a cell (containing no troops) provides an indication of its height. Darker cells are higher. Height is important since the difference in height between two cells (the gradient) has a direct impact on the number of troops that can travel between those cells in one game cycle. Troops cannot travel through water, and hence vector buttons will be disabled if the “destination” cell contains water.

Filling
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Filling increases the height of a cell and this may have a strategic significance. Filling requires that a number of troops be sacrificed by way of cost. When the cell being filled becomes full of your troops, they will be taken and in return the cell height will increase.
The Fill button can be used to toggle the filling operation. The letter “F” within a cell indicates that filling is in progress. Filling is mutually exclusive with Digging, Building, Scuttling and Fighting, if one of these is selected or occurs then filling will automatically be disabled. It is not possible to fill the cell that contains a base. It is also not possible to fill above the maximum height.

Digging
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Digging is the reverse of Filling. Digging has strategic significance because it allows terrain height barriers to be removed. The Dig button can be used to toggle the digging operation. The letter “D” is a cell indicates that digging is in progress. Like filling, digging requires troops to be passed into the cell and these troops will be taken in return for a reduction in the cell height. Filling is mutually exclusive with Digging, Building, Scuttling and Fighting, if one of these is selected or occurs then filling will automatically be disabled. It is not possible to dig below a minimum type.

Fighting
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Fighting occurs when troops move across a vector into a cell that contains enemy troops. The resulting battle is indicated by an “X” in that Cell. When an “X” is displayed it means that ownership of the cell has been lost temporarily, and the outcome of the “battle algorithm” will determine who ownership is given to (ie the side with the most troops remaining), as well as how many troops died in the battle from each side.

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Fighting is mutually exclusive with Digging, Filling, Building and Scuttling

It is sometimes the case that troops will enter an enemy xell but no X will be displayed. In this case, the troops entering are so vastly outnumbered that they are killed immediately, and hence no battle can be seen to occur. In reality a battle does occur, but it happens so quickly that no X is displayed. It is foolish to send troops to their deaths in such a way.

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When a battle is in progress, no one side is considered to be the owner of the cell and hence no side can create a vector, dig, fill, build or scuttle.

Building
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It is possible to build additional bases within cells that you own. To gain ownership of a cell you must first move troops into that cell and then press the Build button to toggle the build operation. The letter “B” will be displayed in the cell to indicate that a base is being built. A continuous flow of troops is required to flow into the cell to keep the building operation going. Full cells of troops are taken in return for a percentage of the base circle. The percentage of a base that is built is reflected by the percentage of the circle that is drawn. Only when the base is 100% complete will it be drawn as a complete circle and start producing troops. Building is mutually exclusive with Digging, Filling, Scuttling and Fighting.

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Scuttling
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Scuttling is the opposite to building. You can destroy your own base to prevent it from falling into the hands of your enemy. Note that the troops in your base will be taken by way of cost for the scuttling operation. However, one full cell of troops will not scuttle the whole base and hence adjacent cells with troops should be vectored in to complete the scuttle. A partially scuttled base will be quite easy for the enemy to capture and rebuild. Scuttling is mutually exclusive with Digging, Filling, Building, and Fighting.

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